Document Detail


The business end of health information technology. Can a fully integrated electronic health record increase provider productivity in a large community practice?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20695245     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Electronic health records (EHRs) are expected to transform and improve the way medicine is practiced. However, providers perceive many barriers toward implementing new health information technology. Specifically, they are most concerned about the potentially negative impact on their practice finances and productivity. This study compares the productivity of 75 providers at a large urban primary care practice from January 2005 to February 2009, before and after implementing an EHR system, using longitudinal mixed model analyses. While decreases in productivity were observed at the time the EHR system was implemented, most providers quickly recovered, showing increases in productivity per month shortly after EHR implementation. Overall, providers had significant productivity increases of 1.7% per month per provider from pre- to post-EHR adoption. The majority of the productivity gains occurred after the practice instituted a pay-for-performance program, enabled by the data capture of the EHRs. Coupled with pay-for-performance, EHRs can spur rapid gains in provider productivity.
Authors:
Samantha De Leon; Alison Connelly-Flores; Farzad Mostashari; Sarah C Shih
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of medical practice management : MPM     Volume:  25     ISSN:  8755-0229     ISO Abbreviation:  J Med Pract Manage     Publication Date:    2010 May-Jun
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-08-10     Completed Date:  2010-09-14     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8605494     Medline TA:  J Med Pract Manage     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  342-9     Citation Subset:  T    
Affiliation:
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 161 William Street, 5th Floor, CN-52, New York, NY 10038, USA. sdeleon@health.nyc.gov
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Community Health Services*
Efficiency, Organizational*
Electronic Health Records*
United States

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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