Document Detail


The biomechanics of lower abdominal steering-wheel loading.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1920563     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Twenty-five fully anesthetized swine were tested for biomechanical responses to lower abdominal steering-wheel loading. Supine subjects were impacted with the lower rim of a segmented steering wheel in a ventrodorsad direction at approximately the L-4 level of the lumbar spine. Peak force ranged from 0.13 to 8.56 kN, peak stroke from 16.1 to 123.8 mm, and peak velocity from 1.7 to 12.4 m/s. Mechanical response is presented in terms of force-deflection cross plots of force-time and displacement-time histories. Overall stiffness, normalized for equal stress-equal velocity scaling using a standard human cadaver mass, was found to be rate dependent and corridors are suggested. These findings indicate that the stiffness of the lower abdomen is less than upper abdominal stiffness and significantly lower than chest stiffness, although lower abdominal stiffness in living subjects is still slightly higher than it is in the lower abdomen of human cadavers. The maximum viscous response (VCmax) was a strong predictor of injury risk for the entire data set.
Authors:
M A Miller
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of trauma     Volume:  31     ISSN:  0022-5282     ISO Abbreviation:  J Trauma     Publication Date:  1991 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1991-11-08     Completed Date:  1991-11-08     Revised Date:  2003-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376373     Medline TA:  J Trauma     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1301-9     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
General Motors Research Laboratories, Biomedical Science Department, Warren, MI 48090-9058.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Abdominal Injuries / etiology,  physiopathology*
Accidents, Traffic
Animals
Biomechanics
Blood Pressure
Electrocardiography
Swine

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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