Document Detail


The baboon as a good model for studies of human kidney development.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16148064     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Because of the improved survival of premature neonates in recent years, it is important to investigate the effects of premature delivery on the kidney, in which nephrogenesis is still ongoing during the third trimester. Hence, an appropriate animal model that is similar to humans is essential. The aim of the current study is to determine the time course of nephrogenesis in the baboon, to establish whether it is a suitable model of human nephrogenesis. At the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (San Antonio, TX), fetal baboons were delivered prematurely by cesarean delivery and at term by natural delivery. Fixed kidneys from 125-, 140-, 175-, and 185-d gestation baboons were assessed morphologically for evidence of a nephrogenic zone. Nephron number, kidney volume, and glomerular and corpuscle volume were also estimated using unbiased stereology. Morphologic assessment confirmed the presence of metanephric mesenchyme and immature glomeruli in the nephrogenic zone of the kidneys from the prematurely delivered fetuses at 125 and 140 d gestation. At 175 d gestation and at term, the nephrons seemed to be mature. Both kidney weight (R2= 0.918, p = 0.0002) and kidney volume (R2= 0.837, p = 0.001) were very strongly correlated with nephron number. There was also a direct relationship between gestational age (R2= 0.589, p = 0.03) and birth weight (R2= 0.562, p = 0.03) with nephron number. In conclusion, in this study, nephrogenesis in the baboon is complete before term by 175 d gestation, which is similar to humans. Hence, the baboon is a suitable model for future studies to investigate human kidney development.
Authors:
Lina Gubhaju; M Jane Black
Related Documents :
10591444 - Estimation of fetal weight: mean value from multiple formulas.
6440304 - The relationship between prenatal lethality or fetal weight and intrauterine position i...
16404414 - Low maternal vitamin b12 status is associated with intrauterine growth retardation in u...
11952204 - Sudden gains in recovering from depression: are they also found in psychotherapies othe...
2425794 - The prognostic value of hcg, papp-a, oestradiol-17 beta and progesterone in early human...
12170364 - Outcome of prenatally diagnosed congenital heart disease: an update.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatric research     Volume:  58     ISSN:  0031-3998     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatr. Res.     Publication Date:  2005 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-09-08     Completed Date:  2006-01-19     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0100714     Medline TA:  Pediatr Res     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  505-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. Lina.Gubbhaju@med.monash.edu.au
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Birth Weight
Kidney / growth & development*
Models, Animal*
Nephrons / growth & development
Organ Size
Papio
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL-52636/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; P51RR13986/RR/NCRR NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Is age of onset of Crohn's disease governed by mutations in NOD2/caspase recruitment domains 15 and ...
Next Document:  Alterations in fetal kidney development and elevations in arterial blood pressure in young adult she...