Document Detail


The antibacterial shield of the human urinary tract.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23538695     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Antibacterial peptides and proteins maintain the sterility of the human urinary tract. A broad-spectrum antimicrobial protein, ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7), previously discovered to play a role in controlling the growth of bacteria on human skin, has now been shown to have an important antibacterial function in the human urinary tract.
Authors:
Michael Zasloff
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Kidney international     Volume:  83     ISSN:  1523-1755     ISO Abbreviation:  Kidney Int.     Publication Date:  2013 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-03-29     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0323470     Medline TA:  Kidney Int     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  548-50     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Georgetown Transplant Institute, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA.
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