Document Detail


The additional effect of orthotic devices on exercise therapy for patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21402565     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The aim of the study is to determine "the additional effect of... function" for patellofemoral pain syndrom (PFPS). The additional effect of orthotic devices over exercise therapy on pain and function. A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane and PEDro. Randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials of patients diagnosed with PFPS evaluating a clinically relevant outcome were included. Treatment had to include exercise therapy combined with orthotics, compared with an identical exercise programme with or without sham orthotics. Data were summarised using a best evidence synthesis. Eight trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which three had a low risk of bias. There is moderate evidence for no additive effectiveness of knee braces to exercise therapy on pain (effect sizes (ES) varied from -0.14 to 0.04) and conflicting evidence on function (ES -0.33). There is moderate evidence for no difference between knee braces and exercise therapy versus placebo knee braces and exercise therapy on pain and function (ES -0.1-0.10). More studies of high methodological quality are needed to draw definitive conclusions.
Authors:
Nynke M Swart; Robbart van Linschoten; Sita M A Bierma-Zeinstra; Marienke van Middelkoop
Related Documents :
238405 - Interaction of o2 and co2 in sustained exercise hyperemia of canine skeletal muscle.
1692935 - Augmentation of coronary flow improves myocardial function in exercise.
14613735 - Benefits of statin treatment in cardiac syndrome-x1.
17170205 - Peak vs. total reactive hyperemia: which determines the magnitude of flow-mediated dila...
17486165 - Circulating lipids are lowered but pancreatic islet lipid metabolism and insulin secret...
4068965 - Sleep deprivation, physical fatigue, and the perception of exercise intensity.
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-3-14
Journal Detail:
Title:  British journal of sports medicine     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1473-0480     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-3-15     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0432520     Medline TA:  Br J Sports Med     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Clinical Health Sciences, Department of Physical Therapy Science, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Progression of lumbar disc degeneration over a decade: a heritability study.
Next Document:  Increased running speed and pre-race muscle damage as risk factors for exercise-associated muscle cr...