Document Detail


The accommodative response to subthreshold blur and to perceptual fading during the Troxler phenomenon.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  3774480     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A study is reported which shows that accommodation can be stimulated by a blur stimulus which is below the threshold for visual perception. It is also shown that perceptual fading of the target, caused by stabilization of the retinal image (Troxler phenomenon), can eliminate the accommodative response causing it to default to its resting level. The first finding suggests a way in which the visual system can filter the percept of blur out of our conscious awareness and still effectively utilize the blur as a steady-state error for the accommodative control system. The second finding is consistent with a locus for the Troxler phenomenon in the early afferent part of the visual pathway, ie the retinal ganglion cells.
Authors:
J C Kotulak; C M Schor
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Perception     Volume:  15     ISSN:  0301-0066     ISO Abbreviation:  Perception     Publication Date:  1986  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1986-11-24     Completed Date:  1986-11-24     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372307     Medline TA:  Perception     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  7-15     Citation Subset:  IM; S    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Accommodation, Ocular*
Adult
Humans
Psychophysics
Retinal Ganglion Cells / physiology
Sensory Thresholds
Visual Perception / physiology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1-445420-32011//PHS HHS; EYO-3532-04/EY/NEI NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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