Document Detail


You are what you eat, and so are your children: the impact of micronutrients on the epigenetic programming of offspring.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23892892     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The research field of fetal programming has developed tremendously over the years and increasing knowledge suggests that both maternal and paternal unbalanced diet can have long-lasting effects on the health of offspring. Studies implicate that macronutrients play an important role in fetal programming, although the importance of micronutrients is also becoming increasingly apparent. Folic acid and vitamins B2, B6 and B12 are essential for one-carbon metabolism and are involved in DNA methylation. They can therefore influence the programming of the offspring's epigenome. Also, other micronutrients such as vitamins A and C, iron, chromium, zinc and flavonoids play a role in fetal programming. Since it is estimated that approximately 78 % of pregnant women in the US take vitamin supplements during pregnancy, more attention should be given to the long-term effects of these supplements on offspring. In this review we address several different studies which illustrate that an unbalanced diet prior and during pregnancy, regarding the intake of micronutrients of both mother and father, can have long-lasting effects on the health of adult offspring.
Authors:
Kimberly Vanhees; Indira G C Vonhögen; Frederik J van Schooten; Roger W L Godschalk
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-7-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1420-9071     ISO Abbreviation:  Cell. Mol. Life Sci.     Publication Date:  2013 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-7-29     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9705402     Medline TA:  Cell Mol Life Sci     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Toxicology, School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism (NUTRIM), Maastricht UMC+, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands, kimberly.vanhees@maastrichtuniversity.nl.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  IL-18 in inflammatory and autoimmune disease.
Next Document:  Covalent and allosteric inhibitors of the ATPase VCP/p97 induce cancer cell death.