Document Detail


Women's experiences following severe perineal trauma: a meta-ethnographic synthesis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23057716     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIMS: This article presents a meta-ethnographic synthesis of studies on women's experiences of sustaining a third or fourth degree tear during childbirth. BACKGROUND: It has been reported that for women who sustain third or fourth degree perineal tears (severe perineal trauma) some may experience extensive physical and psychological outcomes. DESIGN: A meta-ethnographic synthesis. DATA SOURCES: The CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, MD Consult, and SocIndex with Full Text databases were searched for the period January 1996-June 2011. Out of 478 papers retrieved four met the review aim. REVIEW METHODS: A meta-ethnographic synthesis approach was undertaken using analytic strategies and theme synthesis techniques of reciprocal translation and refutational investigation. Quality appraisal was undertaken using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tool. FINDINGS: Four qualitative papers were included, with three major themes identified: 'I am broken and a failure', 'Dismissed, devalued and disregarded', and 'The practicalities of the unpredictable perineum'. CONCLUSION: There is evidence to suggest that for women who experience severe perineal trauma during childbirth the physical and psychological outcomes can be complex, with some women experiencing social isolation and marginalization due to their ongoing symptomatology. Severe perineal trauma appeared to affect not only physiological and psychological well-being but also altered the women's understanding of their identity as sexual beings. Health professionals should be mindful of the language that they use and their actions during suturing and the postpartum period to avoid causing unnecessary distress.
Authors:
Holly Priddis; Hannah Dahlen; Virginia Schmied
Related Documents :
9215436 - Challenges in assessing risk factors in epidemiologic studies on back disorders.
16512316 - Job control and burnout across occupations.
23165656 - Cost-effectiveness of bazedoxifene compared with raloxifene in the treatment of postmen...
24829126 - Short qt in a cohort of 1.7 million persons: prevalence, correlates, and prognosis.
22028926 - Body configuration as a predictor of mortality: comparison of five anthropometric measu...
23268836 - Job strain, effort-reward imbalance and neck, shoulder and wrist symptoms among chinese...
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-10-12
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of advanced nursing     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1365-2648     ISO Abbreviation:  J Adv Nurs     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-12     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7609811     Medline TA:  J Adv Nurs     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
© 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Affiliation:
School of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health and Science, University of Western Sydney, Penrith South DC, New South Wales, Australia.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Reduction of n-3 PUFAs, specifically DHA and EPA, and enhancement of peroxisomal beta-oxidation in t...
Next Document:  The element effect revisited: factors determining leaving group ability in activated nucleophilic ar...