Document Detail


Women with elevated food addiction symptoms show accelerated reactions, but no impaired inhibitory control, in response to pictures of high-calorie food-cues.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23121803     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Addictive behaviors are accompanied by a lack of inhibitory control, specifically when individuals are confronted with substance-related cues. Thus, we expected women with symptoms of food addiction to be impaired in inhibitory control, when confronted with palatable, high-calorie food-cues. Female college students (N=50) were divided in low and high food addiction groups based on the symptom count of the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Participants performed a Go/No-go-task with high-calorie food-cues or neutral pictures presented behind the targets. Self-reported impulsivity was also assessed. The high food addiction group had faster reaction times in response to food-cues as compared to neutral cues and reported higher attentional impulsivity than the low food addiction group. Commission and omission errors did not differ between groups or picture types. Hence, women with food addiction symptoms reported higher attentional impulsivity and reacted faster in response to food-cues, although neither increased self-reported motor impulsivity nor impaired behavioral inhibition was found. Food addiction symptoms seem to be related to attentional aspects of impulsivity but not other facets of impulsivity.
Authors:
Adrian Meule; Annika Lutz; Claus Vögele; Andrea Kübler
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2012-09-05
Journal Detail:
Title:  Eating behaviors     Volume:  13     ISSN:  1873-7358     ISO Abbreviation:  Eat Behav     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-05     Completed Date:  2013-04-24     Revised Date:  2014-03-25    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101090048     Medline TA:  Eat Behav     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  423-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Attention / physiology*
Behavior, Addictive / diagnosis,  psychology*
Cues
Female
Food*
Humans
Impulsive Behavior / psychology
Inhibition (Psychology)*
Questionnaires
Reaction Time / physiology*
Reward

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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