Document Detail


Women and cardiovascular disease.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11072273     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Cardiovascular disease remains the number one killer in the United States. The face of the person with cardiovascular disease is changing. No longer is the middle-aged man at highest risk. Current data reveal that women, especially postmenopausal women, are at highest risk for cardiovascular disease. This article identifies the differences noted between men and women with cardiovascular disease, including effects in presentation, identification, and treatment.
Authors:
J McFetridge; J Hanley; D M Allen; A Cheek; A Kelly; D J Cheek
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Nursing clinics of North America     Volume:  35     ISSN:  0029-6465     ISO Abbreviation:  Nurs. Clin. North Am.     Publication Date:  2000 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-01-04     Completed Date:  2001-01-04     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0042033     Medline TA:  Nurs Clin North Am     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  833-9     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM; N    
Affiliation:
Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. Judy.mcfetridge@duke.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Clinical Trials as Topic
Coronary Disease* / diagnosis,  epidemiology,  mortality,  therapy
Female
Hemodynamics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Prejudice
Sex Factors
Women's Health*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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