Document Detail


Why respiratory biology? The meaning and significance of respiration and its integrative study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21672859     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Traditionally the process of respiration is divided into three phases: (1) cellular respiration, (2) transport of respiratory gases and (3) ventilation of the gas exchange organs (breathing). Thereby organisms assimilate chemical energy from the environment, and within their cells transfer it from molecule to molecule in a stepwise fashion. Although studied separately, these phases represent a continuum and cellular respiration in all life forms has much in common. Ironically, these respiratory foci have been artificially delineated by their own practitioners, who tend to publish in their own journals, and attend their own conferences. The goal of modern respiratory biology should be to understand biological connectivity and complexity by viewing an organism as a series of interconnecting systems from molecule to ecosystem. The future of science in general, and biology in particular, lies in disciplinary networking: combining the results of traditional disciplines to better understand the whole. Because of its universality, Respiratory Biology can best provide this bridge and improve interdisciplinary studies in biology generally. To this end, the First International Congress of Respiratory Biology was held from August 14 to 16, 2006, at Bonn, Germany. As evident from the success of this inaugural meeting, these are exciting times for Respiratory Biology. The explosion of "X-omics" and systems biology, the powerful genetic approaches to disease treatment, and the long-standing and newly emerging questions in evolutionary biology and ecology; all portend a continuing role of respiratory biology as a key integrative discipline.
Authors:
Steven F Perry; Warren W Burggren
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2007-08-30
Journal Detail:
Title:  Integrative and comparative biology     Volume:  47     ISSN:  1540-7063     ISO Abbreviation:  Integr. Comp. Biol.     Publication Date:  2007 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-06-15     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101152341     Medline TA:  Integr Comp Biol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  506-9     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
*Institut für Zoologie, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Poppelsdorfer Schloss, 53115 Bonn, Germany; Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton TX, USA.
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