Document Detail


What is the evidence for chronic concussion-related changes in retired athletes: behavioural, pathological and clinical outcomes?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23479493     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper was to review the current state of evidence for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in retired athletes and to consider the potential differential diagnoses that require consideration when retired athletes present with cognitive and psychiatric problems.
DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Mosby's Index, PsycEXTRA, PsycINFO and Scopus. Key words included CTE, dementia pugilistica, punch drunk syndrome, traumatic encephalopathy, CTE, repetitive head injury, sports concussion, multiple concussions, chronic concussions, subconcussive blow and sports-related traumatic brain injury.
RESULTS: At present, there are no published epidemiological, cross-sectional or prospective studies relating to modern CTE. Owing to the nature of the published studies, being case reports or pathological case series, it is not possible to determine the causality or risk factors with any certainty. As such, the speculation that repeated concussion or subconcussive impacts cause CTE remains unproven. The extent to which age-related changes, psychiatric or mental health illness, alcohol/drug use or coexisting dementing illnesses contribute to this process is largely unaccounted for in the published literature.
CONCLUSIONS: At present, the interpretation of causation in the modern CTE case studies should proceed cautiously. The causal assumptions require further prospective or longitudinal studies on the topic.
Authors:
Paul McCrory; Willem H Meeuwisse; Jeffrey S Kutcher; Barry D Jordan; Andrew Gardner
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  British journal of sports medicine     Volume:  47     ISSN:  1473-0480     ISO Abbreviation:  Br J Sports Med     Publication Date:  2013 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-03-12     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0432520     Medline TA:  Br J Sports Med     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  327-30     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, , Heidelberg, Australia.
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