Document Detail


Water Immersion Recovery for Athletes: Effect on Exercise Performance and Practical Recommendations.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23743793     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Water immersion is increasingly being used by elite athletes seeking to minimize fatigue and accelerate post-exercise recovery. Accelerated short-term (hours to days) recovery may improve competition performance, allow greater training loads or enhance the effect of a given training load. However, the optimal water immersion protocols to assist short-term recovery of performance still remain unclear. This article will review the water immersion recovery protocols investigated in the literature, their effects on performance recovery, briefly outline the potential mechanisms involved and provide practical recommendations for their use by athletes. For the purposes of this review, water immersion has been divided into four techniques according to water temperature: cold water immersion (CWI; ≤20 °C), hot water immersion (HWI; ≥36 °C), contrast water therapy (CWT; alternating CWI and HWI) and thermoneutral water immersion (TWI; >20 to <36 °C). Numerous articles have reported that CWI can enhance recovery of performance in a variety of sports, with immersion in 10-15 °C water for 5-15 min duration appearing to be most effective at accelerating performance recovery. However, the optimal CWI duration may depend on the water temperature, and the time between CWI and the subsequent exercise bout appears to influence the effect on performance. The few studies examining the effect of post-exercise HWI on subsequent performance have reported conflicting findings; therefore the effect of HWI on performance recovery is unclear. CWT is most likely to enhance performance recovery when equal time is spent in hot and cold water, individual immersion durations are short (~1 min) and the total immersion duration is up to approximately 15 min. A dose-response relationship between CWT duration and recovery of exercise performance is unlikely to exist. Some articles that have reported CWT to not enhance performance recovery have had methodological issues, such as failing to detect a decrease in performance in control trials, not performing full-body immersion, or using hot showers instead of pools. TWI has been investigated as both a control to determine the effect of water temperature on performance recovery, and as an intervention itself. However, due to conflicting findings it is uncertain whether TWI improves recovery of subsequent exercise performance. Both CWI and CWT appear likely to assist recovery of exercise performance more than HWI and TWI; however, it is unclear which technique is most effective. While the literature on the use of water immersion for recovery of exercise performance is increasing, further research is required to obtain a more complete understanding of the effects on performance.
Authors:
Nathan G Versey; Shona L Halson; Brian T Dawson
Related Documents :
1519833 - Decreased airway mucosal prostaglandin e2 production during airway obstruction in an an...
12665133 - An introductory survey of helminth control practices in south africa and anthelmintic r...
23070993 - Increased body mass index in ankylosing spondylitis is associated with greater burden o...
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-6-7
Journal Detail:
Title:  Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1179-2035     ISO Abbreviation:  Sports Med     Publication Date:  2013 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-6-7     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8412297     Medline TA:  Sports Med     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Performance Recovery, Australian Institute of Sport, PO Box 176, Belconnen, Canberra, ACT, 2616, Australia, nathan.versey@gmail.com.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Role of Intensive Training in the Growth and Maturation of Artistic Gymnasts.
Next Document:  Influence of Maternal and Child Lifestyle-Related Characteristics on the Socioeconomic Inequality in...