Document Detail


Volume of the excised specimen and prediction of surgical site infection in pilonidal sinus procedures (surgical site infection after pilonidal sinus surgery).
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23224334     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: In previous studies, a lack of antibiotic prophylaxis, smoking and obesity were described as factors that contribute to the development of a surgical site infection (SSI) after pilonidal disease (PD) surgery. In this study, we evaluated whether the volume of the excised specimen (VS) was a risk factor for SSI. METHODS: The patients who underwent surgical treatment for PD from January 2010 through December 2011 were retrospectively evaluated in terms of SSI, time off work and healing time. The single and multiple explanatory variable(s) logistic regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: One-hundred and sixty patients were included in the study. SSI occurred in 19 (11.9 %) patients. In the multiple explanatory variable logistic regression analysis, VS was emerged as a risk factor for SSI (OR 18.78, 95 % CI 2.38-148.10; P < 0.005). The healing time and time off work were longer when a SSI occurred (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the rate of SSI after the surgical treatment of PD is higher in patients with a high VS. A SSI significantly prolongs the healing time. Surgeons can use this data for assessing the SSI risk. As a preventive measure, prolonged use of an empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic may be beneficial in patients with a high VS.
Authors:
Husnu Alptekin; Huseyin Yilmaz; Seyit Ali Kayis; Mustafa Sahin
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-12-9
Journal Detail:
Title:  Surgery today     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1436-2813     ISO Abbreviation:  Surg. Today     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-12-10     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9204360     Medline TA:  Surg Today     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Selcuklu Medical School Selcuk University, Genel Cerrahi AD, 42075, Konya, Turkey, halptekin@hotmail.com.
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