Document Detail


Vitamin E intake and risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15529299     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We therefore examined prospectively whether individuals who regularly use supplements of the antioxidant vitamins E and C have a lower risk of ALS than nonusers. The study population comprised 957,740 individuals 30 years of age or older participating in the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study II. Information on vitamin use was collected at time of recruitment in 1982; participants then were followed up for ALS deaths from 1989 through 1998 via linkage with the National Death Index. During the follow-up, we documented 525 deaths from ALS. Regular use of vitamin E supplements was associated with a lower risk of dying of ALS. The age- and smoking-adjusted relative risk was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-1.41) among occasional users, 0.59 (95% CI, 0.36-0.96) in regular users for less than 10 years, and 0.38 (95% CI, 0.16-0.92) in regular users for 10 years or more as compared with nonusers of vitamin E (p for trend = 0.004). In contrast, no significant associations were found for use of vitamin C or multivitamins. These results suggest that vitamin E supplementation could have a role in ALS prevention.
Authors:
Alberto Ascherio; Marc G Weisskopf; Eilis J O'reilly; Eric J Jacobs; Marjorie L McCullough; Eugenia E Calle; Merit Cudkowicz; Michael J Thun
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Annals of neurology     Volume:  57     ISSN:  0364-5134     ISO Abbreviation:  Ann. Neurol.     Publication Date:  2005 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-01-03     Completed Date:  2005-03-14     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7707449     Medline TA:  Ann Neurol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  104-10     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Building 2, Boston, MA 02115, USA. aascheri@hsph.harvard.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis / epidemiology,  prevention & control*
Antioxidants / administration & dosage*
Ascorbic Acid / administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk*
Risk Factors
Sex Factors
Vitamin E / administration & dosage*
Vitamins / administration & dosage
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
NS 045893/NS/NINDS NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Antioxidants; 0/Vitamins; 1406-18-4/Vitamin E; 50-81-7/Ascorbic Acid

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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