Document Detail


Ventilatory support during exercise in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis sequelae.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9377909     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether intermittent positive pressure ventilation through a nasal mask (NIPPV) applied during exercise in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis sequelae (PTS) could improve arterial blood gas measurements, ameliorate breathlessness, and increase exercise endurance. PATIENTS: Seven PTS patients with a severe restrictive ventilatory defect (mean [SD] vital capacity, 1.02 [0.25] I) enrolled in this study had experienced NIPPV previously, and were familiar with the procedure. DESIGN: The patients underwent four constant-load cycle ergometer tests in the supine position to tolerance. The tests were performed with and without NIPPV, while breathing normoxic air (Air) or supplemental oxygen (O2; 35%). NIPPV was delivered during exercise in a controlled, volume-cycled mechanical ventilation mode, and the ventilator settings were modulated manually to meet patients' respiratory demands as estimated from the airway pressure waveform and the patient's breathlessness. RESULTS: All patients matched their breathing to the ventilator cycle during most of the exercise while receiving NIPPV. NIPPV significantly prolonged their exercise endurance time, from a mean (SD) of 180 (58) s to 310 (96) s in Air, and from 227 (64) s to 465 (201) s in O2. During exercise, NIPPV effectively decreased their breathlessness and significantly improved arterial blood gas measurements. CONCLUSIONS: NIPPV applied during exercise can effectively support ventilation, significantly ameliorate breathlessness, and consequently improve exercise endurance in patients with PTS.
Authors:
T Tsuboi; M Ohi; K Chin; H Hirata; N Otsuka; H Kita; K Kuno
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Chest     Volume:  112     ISSN:  0012-3692     ISO Abbreviation:  Chest     Publication Date:  1997 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1997-11-10     Completed Date:  1997-11-10     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0231335     Medline TA:  Chest     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1000-7     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Physiology, Chest Disease Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Carbon Dioxide / blood
Dyspnea / etiology,  therapy
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume / physiology
Humans
Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation* / instrumentation,  methods
Male
Masks
Middle Aged
Oxygen / blood
Oxygen Inhalation Therapy
Physical Endurance / physiology
Physical Exertion / physiology*
Pressure
Pulmonary Ventilation / physiology
Respiration / physiology
Respiratory Insufficiency / etiology,  physiopathology,  therapy*
Supine Position
Total Lung Capacity / physiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary / complications*
Vital Capacity / physiology
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
124-38-9/Carbon Dioxide; 7782-44-7/Oxygen

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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