Document Detail


Ventilatory relief of the sensation of the urge to breathe in humans: are pulmonary receptors important?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8683478     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
1. The sensation of an urge to breathe (air hunger) associated with a fixed level of hypercapnia is reduced when ventilation increases. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether pulmonary receptors are important in this mechanism. 2. Five heart-lung transplant (HLT) subjects and five control subjects were studied during periods of mechanical and spontaneous ventilation. End-tidal Pco2 (PET,CO2) was increased by altering the level of inspired CO2. Throughout, subjects rated sensations of air hunger. Air hunger was also monitored during and immediately following maximal periods of breath-holding. 3. When the level of mechanical ventilation was fixed, both groups experienced a high degree of air hunger when PET,CO2 was increased by about 10 mmHg. At similar levels of hypercapnia, both groups derived relief from approximately twofold increases in tidal volume, although relief was slightly less effective in HLT subjects. This was reversible, with decreases in the level of mechanical ventilation rapidly giving rise to increased ratings of air hunger. 4. With breath-holding, all subjects obtained some respiratory relief within 2 s of the break point; there was no significant difference between the groups. 5. The results suggest that sensations of an urge to breathe induced by hypercapnia can be modulated by changes in tidal volume in the presumed absence of afferent information from the lung.
Authors:
H R Harty; C J Mummery; L Adams; R B Banzett; I G Wright; N R Banner; M H Yacoub; A Guz
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of physiology     Volume:  490 ( Pt 3)     ISSN:  0022-3751     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Physiol. (Lond.)     Publication Date:  1996 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1996-08-19     Completed Date:  1996-08-19     Revised Date:  2010-08-25    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0266262     Medline TA:  J Physiol     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  805-15     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, London, UK.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Female
Humans
Hypercapnia / physiopathology
Male
Pulmonary Ventilation / physiology*
Respiration / physiology*
Sensation / physiology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL-46690/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; //Wellcome Trust
Comments/Corrections

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