Document Detail


VBAC: What Does the Evidence Show?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23090465     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Declining rates of vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) are contributing to rising total cesarean delivery rates. The reasons behind the decreased utilization of VBAC are complex, but concerns about the safety of a trial of labor after cesarean are often cited. This manuscript will present a summary of existing evidence on maternal and fetal/neonatal outcomes associated with trial of labor after cesarean/VBAC, and highlight findings from recent contributions to this literature.
Authors:
Caroline Signore
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Clinical obstetrics and gynecology     Volume:  55     ISSN:  1532-5520     ISO Abbreviation:  Clin Obstet Gynecol     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-23     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0070014     Medline TA:  Clin Obstet Gynecol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  961-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Health and Human Services, Pregnancy and Perinatology Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
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