Document Detail


Use of the optical urethrotome knife in the treatment of a benign low rectal anastomotic stricture.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1855431     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Several methods of treatment for benign anastomotic strictures following anterior resection have been described. Surgical intervention in terms of re-exploration and excision of the stricture or the formation of a permanent colostomy will be accompanied by substantial morbidity. The dilatation of these strictures without direct vision may not be safe. We describe a simple method of treating benign rectal anastomotic stricture using an optical urethrotome knife under direct vision. This technique affords an accurate incision of the stricture to increase the size of the lumen, thereby relieving obstruction.
Authors:
Y W Chia; S S Ngoi; K H Tung
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Diseases of the colon and rectum     Volume:  34     ISSN:  0012-3706     ISO Abbreviation:  Dis. Colon Rectum     Publication Date:  1991 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1991-08-29     Completed Date:  1991-08-29     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372764     Medline TA:  Dis Colon Rectum     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  717-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, National University Hospital, Singapore.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Anastomosis, Surgical / adverse effects*
Constriction, Pathologic / surgery
Dilatation / instrumentation,  methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Optics and Photonics
Rectum / pathology,  surgery*
Surgical Instruments*
Surgical Staplers
Urethra

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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