Document Detail


Use of a cane for ambulation: marker and mitigator of impairment in older people who report no difficulty walking.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12028207     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: To measure disability, patients are often asked whether they have difficulty performing daily tasks. However, recent work suggests that functional problems may be detected earlier by inquiring about modifications in the way tasks are performed. We sought to describe the characteristics of older people who deny difficulty walking but nevertheless have modified the manner in which they walk, by use of a cane. We also tested the hypothesis that, among older people who deny difficulty walking, those using a cane have more mobility problems and are at greater risk for future mobility problems than those not using a cane. DESIGN: Longitudinal survey study, with measures at baseline and 2-year follow-up. SETTING: Population-based survey of urban older people. PARTICIPANTS: One thousand two hundred fifty-one community-dwelling older persons without severe cognitive impairment who reported no difficulty walking at baseline. MEASUREMENTS: Self-reported health, activities of daily living (ADL), and mobility status. RESULTS: Among older people who denied difficulty walking, those who used a cane at baseline (7 of subjects) were older and more likely to have taken medication for a heart condition or arthritis, to have an ADL deficit, and to have been hospitalized in the past year. They were less likely to have walked for pleasure in the past month and more likely to report difficulty crossing roads or intersections. Moreover, those using a cane at baseline were more likely to develop new mobility problems at follow-up. For example, 15 of those who used a cane at baseline reported new difficulty walking at follow-up, compared with 2 of those who did not use a cane. CONCLUSION: Older people who deny difficulty walking but who use a cane are at greater risk than those who do not use a cane for the development of difficulty walking and other new mobility problems. Asking patients about task modification rather than difficulty alone may be a more sensitive way to detect early or mild functional problems.
Authors:
Zachary M Pine; Barry Gurland; Mary-Margaret Chren
Related Documents :
15117007 - Protected values: no omission bias and no framing effects.
8881537 - Drive-by shootings by violent street gangs in los angeles: a five-year review from 1989...
1786227 - Attribution and intervention in self-poisoning.
25306087 - A simple method for the treatment of cicatricial ectropion and eyelid contraction in pa...
16840037 - Preventing drug use problems: the university as a site for local action.
12640847 - Refining the art of porcelain laminate veneers.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the American Geriatrics Society     Volume:  50     ISSN:  0002-8614     ISO Abbreviation:  J Am Geriatr Soc     Publication Date:  2002 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-05-24     Completed Date:  2002-07-31     Revised Date:  2008-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7503062     Medline TA:  J Am Geriatr Soc     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  263-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, UCSF/Mt. Zion Center on Aging, University of California San Francisco, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canes*
Disability Evaluation*
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment*
Health Status
Humans
Male
Risk
Walking*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K08 AR01962/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; P01 AG07232/AG/NIA NIH HHS; R01 AG10489/AG/NIA NIH HHS; RR00645/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; T32 AG00212/AG/NIA NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Influence of lower extremity strength of healthy older adults on the outcome of an induced trip.
Next Document:  Sequential treatment with calcium alginate dressings and hydrocolloid dressings accelerates pressure...