Document Detail


The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for exercise-induced muscle damage: implications for skeletal muscle development.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23013520     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is a common condition resulting from a bout of vigorous exercise, particularly if the individual is unaccustomed to performance of the given movement. Symptoms of EIMD include delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and a loss of physical function. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed post-exercise to alleviate these symptoms and restore normal physical function. Of potential concern for those who use NSAIDs to treat EIMD is the possibility that they may impair the adaptive response to exercise. Specifically, there is emerging evidence that the action of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzymes, and COX-2 in particular, are important and even necessary to achieve maximal skeletal muscle hypertrophy in response to functional overload. Given that NSAIDs exert their actions by blocking COX and thus suppressing prostaglandin production, a theoretical rationale exists whereby these drugs may have detrimental effects on muscle regeneration and supercompensation. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to extensively review the literature and evaluate the effects of NSAIDs on muscle growth and development. Based on current evidence, there is little reason to believe that the occasional use of NSAIDs will negatively affect muscle growth, although the efficacy for their use in alleviating inflammatory symptoms remains questionable. Evidence on the hypertrophic effects of the chronic use of NSAIDs is less clear. In those who are untrained, it does not appear that regular NSAID use will impede growth in the short term, and at least one study indicates that it may in fact have a positive impact. Given their reported impairment of satellite cell activity, however, longer-term NSAID use may well be detrimental, particularly in those who possess greater growth potential.
Authors:
Brad J Schoenfeld
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)     Volume:  42     ISSN:  1179-2035     ISO Abbreviation:  Sports Med     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-08     Completed Date:  2013-04-01     Revised Date:  2013-05-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8412297     Medline TA:  Sports Med     Country:  New Zealand    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1017-28     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Health Sciences, Program of Exercise Science, Lehman College, CUNY, Bronx, NY 10468, USA. brad@workout911.com
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use*
Exercise*
Humans
Hypertrophy
Muscle Proteins / biosynthesis
Muscle, Skeletal / drug effects*,  growth & development*,  metabolism,  pathology
Muscular Diseases / drug therapy*
Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle / drug effects,  physiology
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0/Muscle Proteins

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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