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Update and Review of Racial Disparities in Sepsis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22913281     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Abstract Background: Sepsis is an excessive systemic inflammatory response activated by invasive infection. There has been substantial epidemiologic literature addressing perceived disparities in sepsis by demographic factors such as gender and race. There also have been multiple examinations of the disparities of sepsis with regard to environmental and socioeconomic factors. This paper reviews the current epidemiologic literature evaluating the association of race with the development of sepsis and its associated outcomes. Methods: Review of pertinent English-language literature. Results: Race is a marker of poverty, preexisting conditions, increased allostatic loads, and decreased access to health systems. Racial disparities and the incidence of sepsis likely are explained by a multiplicity of environmental factors that are not captured by administrative data. Conclusion: Race is a surrogate for many intangible factors that lead to the development of sepsis and inferior outcomes.
Authors:
Todd R Vogel
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-8-22
Journal Detail:
Title:  Surgical infections     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1557-8674     ISO Abbreviation:  Surg Infect (Larchmt)     Publication Date:  2012 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-8-23     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9815642     Medline TA:  Surg Infect (Larchmt)     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of Missouri , Columbia, Missouri.
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