Document Detail


Update on the Management of Hypertension for Secondary Stroke Prevention.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22627064     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
High blood pressure (BP) is the strongest risk factor for stroke. It is estimated that almost 50% of strokes may be attributable to hypertension. Both diastolic and isolated systolic hypertension are important predictors of primary or recurrent strokes, and even minor decreases in BP can reduce the risk of stroke. While the primary prevention of stroke through the treatment of hypertension is well established, the issue of lowering BP after a stroke has been uncertain, particularly since this might worsen cerebral perfusion if autoregulation remains chronically damaged or severe carotid artery stenosis is present. Furthermore, there is substantial evidence to support BP lowering for prevention of a first stroke; however, few trials have focused on antihypertensive therapy for recurrent stroke prevention. In fact, currently, BP management in patients with strokes remains problematic, and questions such as the choice of antihypertensive drug and by how much to reduce BP are yet to be resolved. Recently, the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association published updated guidelines for recurrent stroke prevention, and new recommendations on BP management have been included. Our review presents the most recent evidence on the management of hypertension in patients who have had a stroke.
Authors:
Luis Castilla-Guerra; María Del Carmen Fernández-Moreno
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-5-23
Journal Detail:
Title:  European neurology     Volume:  68     ISSN:  1421-9913     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2012 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-5-25     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0150760     Medline TA:  Eur Neurol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  1-7     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital de la Merced, Osuna, Spain.
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