Document Detail


Unintended pregnancy and prenatal behaviors among urban, black women in Baltimore, Maryland: the Baltimore preterm birth study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18504137     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: We explored associations between intendedness of pregnancy with maternal prenatal behaviors, including smoking, use of alcohol, use of illicit drugs, and late initiation of prenatal care.
METHODS: Pregnant black women ages 18 years or older (N = 913) were enrolled in the study at their first visit to prenatal clinics in Baltimore, Maryland, at which time data were obtained from the women about intendedness of pregnancy. Data on behavioral risks were abstracted from clinical records. Logistic regression was used to adjust analyses for maternal demographic characteristics.
RESULTS: Women with unwanted pregnancies were significantly more likely than women with wanted or mistimed pregnancies, or who were unsure about intendedness, to smoke (odds ratio [OR], 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2-3.3), use alcohol (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1-3.9), and use illicit drugs (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.0-2.9) during pregnancy, and to initiate prenatal care in the third trimester (OR, 5.7; 95% CI, 3.5-9.4).
CONCLUSIONS: Unwanted pregnancy is associated with prenatal behaviors that increase the risk of poor pregnancy outcomes. The facilitation of wanted pregnancies and reduction of harmful maternal behaviors may result in improved pregnancy outcomes in the United States.
Authors:
Suezanne T Orr; Sherman A James; Jerome P Reiter
Related Documents :
12193937 - Preeclampsia in the parous woman: who is at risk?
9721767 - Reproductive career after breech presentation: subsequent pregnancy rates, interpregnan...
19821437 - Medical treatments for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura during pregnancy.
12505947 - A comparative study of three warming interventions to determine the most effective in m...
23610877 - Pregnancy-like (pseudolactational) hyperplasia: uncommon cause of microcalcifications a...
6830727 - Tubal sterilization: findings in a large prospective study.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.     Date:  2008-05-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  Annals of epidemiology     Volume:  18     ISSN:  1873-2585     ISO Abbreviation:  Ann Epidemiol     Publication Date:  2008 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-06-16     Completed Date:  2008-07-17     Revised Date:  2011-12-06    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9100013     Medline TA:  Ann Epidemiol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  545-51     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Health Education and Promotion, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858, USA. orrs@ecu.edu
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans / psychology*,  statistics & numerical data
Baltimore / epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior*
Humans
Logistic Models
Maternal Behavior / psychology*
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unplanned / ethnology,  psychology*
Pregnancy, Unwanted / ethnology,  psychology*
Prenatal Care*
Prospective Studies
Risk-Taking
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
SO 17-13/14/SO/PHSPO CDC HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Fibroblast growth factor induces a neural stem cell phenotype in foetal forebrain progenitors and du...
Next Document:  Neighborhood poverty and American Indian infant death: are the effects identifiable?