Document Detail


Understanding the social brain in autism.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21678390     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Autism is an early onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by disruption of early social interaction. Although the social disability of autism remains the central defining feature of the condition, mechanisms that might account for this disability remain poorly understood. This paper briefly reviews some aspects of the social deficit in autism focusing on new approaches to characterizing social information processing problems, potential brain mechanisms, and theoretical models of the disorder. It will touch on aspects of specific social processes that appear to develop in unusual ways in autism including facial perception, joint attention, and social information processing. The importance of adopting more ecologically valid methods and for integrating the various approaches in deriving new models for social deficits in autism will be highlighted. Future research should build on the emerging synergy of different aspects of social neuroscience. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 53:428-434, 2011.
Authors:
Fred R Volkmar
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Developmental psychobiology     Volume:  53     ISSN:  1098-2302     ISO Abbreviation:  Dev Psychobiol     Publication Date:  2011 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-06-16     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0164074     Medline TA:  Dev Psychobiol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  428-34     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Affiliation:
Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520. fred.volkmar@yale.edu.
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