Document Detail


Understanding exercise self-efficacy and barriers to leisure-time physical activity among postnatal women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20495858     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Studies have demonstrated that postnatal women are at high risk for physical inactivity and generally show lower levels of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) compared to prepregnancy. The overall purpose of the current study was to investigate social cognitive correlates of LTPA among postnatal women during a 6-month period following childbirth. A total of 230 women (mean age = 30.9) provided descriptive data regarding barriers to LTPA and completed measures of LTPA and self-efficacy (exercise and barrier) for at least one of the study data collection periods. A total of 1,520 barriers were content analyzed. Both exercise and barrier self-efficacy were positively associated with subsequent LTPA. Exercise self-efficacy at postnatal week 12 predicted LTPA from postnatal weeks 12 to 18 (β = .40, R (2) = .18) and exercise self-efficacy at postnatal week 24 predicted LTPA during weeks 24-30 (β = .49, R (2) = .30). Barrier self-efficacy at week 18 predicted LTPA from weeks 18 to 24 (β = .33, R (2) = .13). The results of the study identify a number of barriers to LTPA at multiple time points closely following childbirth which may hinder initiation, resumption or maintenance of LTPA. The results also suggest that higher levels of exercise and barrier self-efficacy are prospectively associated with higher levels of LTPA in the early postnatal period. Future interventions should be designed to investigate causal effects of developing participants' exercise and barrier self-efficacy for promoting and maintaining LTPA during the postnatal period.
Authors:
Anita G Cramp; Steven R Bray
Related Documents :
10450478 - Development of a scottish physical activity questionnaire: a tool for use in physical a...
1818698 - Kapalabhati--yogic cleansing exercise. ii. eeg topography analysis.
14767258 - Intermonitor variability of the rt3 accelerometer during typical physical activities.
9612838 - Determinants of exercise among children. ii. a longitudinal analysis.
20066638 - How will military/civilian coordination work for reception of mass casualties from over...
17882218 - Increased terrestrial methane cycling at the palaeocene-eocene thermal maximum.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Maternal and child health journal     Volume:  15     ISSN:  1573-6628     ISO Abbreviation:  Matern Child Health J     Publication Date:  2011 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-06-01     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9715672     Medline TA:  Matern Child Health J     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  642-51     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Kinesiology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada, acramp2@uwo.ca.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Invited Commentary: A Practitioner's Journey into Developmental Research.
Next Document:  Birth characteristics and age at menarche: results from the dietary intervention study in children (...