Document Detail


Underrecording of infant homicide in the United States.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  6849478     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Homicide rates for infants dropped suddenly between 1967 and 1969. The abrupt nature of this decline suggested the change was artifactual. Investigation suggests that two classification revisions instituted at this time were causes of this decline: changes in related codes set forth in the Eighth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases, Adapted, and revision of the standard certificate of death in 1968. Infant homicides may have been disproportionately underrecorded after 1968. (Am J Public Health 1983; 73:195-197.)
Authors:
J Jason; M M Carpenter; C W Tyler
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of public health     Volume:  73     ISSN:  0090-0036     ISO Abbreviation:  Am J Public Health     Publication Date:  1983 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1983-02-25     Completed Date:  1983-02-25     Revised Date:  2009-11-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  1254074     Medline TA:  Am J Public Health     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  195-7     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM; J    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Death Certificates
Homicide*
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality*
United States
Wounds and Injuries / mortality
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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