Document Detail


Uncertainty in pigeons.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  14620372     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Pigeons classified a display of illuminated pixels on a touchscreen as sparse or dense. Correct responses were reinforced with six food pellets; incorrect responses were unreinforced. On some trials an uncertain response option was available. Pecking it was always reinforced with an intermediate number of pellets. Like monkeys and people in related experiments, the birds chose the uncertain response most often when the stimulus presented was difficult to classify correctly, but in other respects their behavior was not functionally similar to human behavior based on conscious uncertainty or to the behavior of monkeys in comparable experiments. Our data were well described by a signal detection model that assumed that the birds were maximizing perceived reward in a consistent way across all the experimental conditions.
Authors:
Leslie M Sole; Sara J Shettleworth; Patrick J Bennett
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Psychonomic bulletin & review     Volume:  10     ISSN:  1069-9384     ISO Abbreviation:  Psychon Bull Rev     Publication Date:  2003 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-11-17     Completed Date:  2004-03-08     Revised Date:  2014-03-25    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9502924     Medline TA:  Psychon Bull Rev     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  738-45     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Columbidae
Decision Making*
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Reward
Transfer (Psychology)
Visual Perception

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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