Document Detail


Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty: catheter perpendicular to the nerve versus catheter parallel to the nerve.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20301819     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study tested the hypothesis that, in continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB) under ultrasound guidance, placing a catheter perpendicular to the nerve can shorten the time of catheter insertion while providing a similar quality of analgesia compared with placing a catheter parallel to the nerve.
METHODS: Fifty patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided CFNB either with the catheter parallel to the nerve technique (parallel group, n = 25) or with the catheter perpendicular to the nerve technique (perpendicular group, n = 25). Patient-controlled morphine analgesia pumps were available to all the patients after surgery. The time of catheter insertion, failure rates, pain scores, morphine consumption, nausea and vomiting, and maximal degree of knee flexion were recorded.
RESULTS: The time of catheter insertion was shorter in the perpendicular group than in the parallel group (12 +/- 3 versus 22 +/- 6 mins, P < 0.01). Failed catheter insertion occurred in 3 (12%) of 25 patients in the parallel group and in none of 25 patients in the perpendicular group (P = 0.2347). There were no significant differences in pain scores, opioid consumption, incidence of nausea and vomiting, and maximal degree of knee flexion between the 2 groups.
CONCLUSIONS: In CFNB under ultrasound guidance, using the catheter perpendicular to the nerve technique can shorten the time of catheter insertion while providing a similar quality of analgesia after total knee arthroplasty as compared with the catheter parallel to the nerve technique.
Authors:
Ai-Zhong Wang; LingLing Gu; Quan-Hong Zhou; Wen-Zong Ni; Wei Jiang
Related Documents :
10540659 - Synthetic dialysis shunts: thrombolysis with the cragg thrombolytic brush catheter.
9539589 - Bacterial colonization and infection rate of continuous epidural catheters in children.
20154599 - Catheter dysfunction and dialysis performance according to vascular access among 736 cr...
20595689 - Emergence of gentamicin-resistant bacteremia in hemodialysis patients receiving gentami...
20175069 - Insertion of tunneled hemodialysis catheters without fluoroscopy.
20230479 - Cryoablation with an 8-mm tip catheter for pediatric atrioventricular nodal reentrant t...
7864689 - Outcome of second line therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.
17509349 - Urodynamic evaluation in children with lipomeningocele: timing for neurosurgery, spinal...
17222109 - Prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following stroke: a systema...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Regional anesthesia and pain medicine     Volume:  35     ISSN:  1532-8651     ISO Abbreviation:  Reg Anesth Pain Med     Publication Date:    2010 Mar-Apr
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-03-19     Completed Date:  2011-02-02     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9804508     Medline TA:  Reg Anesth Pain Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  127-31     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China. w19680420@sohu.com
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Analgesia / methods*
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee*
Female
Femoral Nerve / ultrasonography*
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nerve Block / instrumentation*,  methods

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Incorporating cultural competence content into graduate nursing curricula through community-universi...
Next Document:  Safety of high volume lipid emulsion infusion: a first approximation of LD50 in rats.