Document Detail


US prevalence of self-reported peanut, tree nut, and sesame allergy: 11-year follow-up.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20462634     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Allergy to peanuts and tree nuts (TNs) is the leading cause of fatal allergic reactions in the United States, and the prevalence appears to be increasing. OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine the US prevalence of self-reported peanut, TN, and sesame allergy in 2008 and compare results with comparable surveys conducted in 1997 and 2002. METHODS: A nationwide, cross-sectional, random telephone survey for peanut and TN allergy was conducted with a previously used questionnaire, with additional questions about sesame. RESULTS: A total of 5,300 households (13,534 subjects) were surveyed (participation rate, 42% vs 52% in 2002 and 67% in 1997). Peanut allergy, TN allergy, or both was reported by 1.4% of subjects (95% CI, 1.2% to 1.6%) compared with 1.2% in 2002 and 1.4% in 1997. For adults, the prevalence was 1.3% (95% CI, 1.1% to 1.6%), which was not significantly different from prior surveys. However, the prevalence of peanut or TN allergy for children younger than 18 years was 2.1% (95% CI, 1.6% to 2.7%) compared with 1.2% in 2002 (P = .007) and 0.6% in 1997 (P < .001). The prevalence of peanut allergy in children in 2008 was 1.4% (95% CI, 1.0% to 1.9%) compared with 0.8% in 2002 (P = not significant) and 0.4% in 1997 (P < .0001). The prevalence of childhood TN allergy increased significantly across the survey waves (1.1% in 2008, 0.5% in 2002, and 0.2% in 1997). Sesame allergy was reported by 0.1% (95% CI, 0.0% to 0.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Although caution is required in comparing surveys, peanut allergy, TN allergy, or both continue to be reported by more than 1% of the US population (eg, >3 million subjects) and appear to be increasingly reported among children over the past decade. Sesame allergy is reported much less commonly.
Authors:
Scott H Sicherer; Anne Muñoz-Furlong; James H Godbold; Hugh A Sampson
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2010-05-11
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology     Volume:  125     ISSN:  1097-6825     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.     Publication Date:  2010 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-06-01     Completed Date:  2010-08-24     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  1275002     Medline TA:  J Allergy Clin Immunol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1322-6     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Elliot and Roslyn Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029-6574, USA. scott.sicherer@mssm.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Food Hypersensitivity / epidemiology*
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nut Hypersensitivity / epidemiology*
Peanut Hypersensitivity / epidemiology*
Prevalence
Sesamum / immunology
United States
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
UL 1 RR 029887/RR/NCRR NIH HHS

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