Document Detail


Two Pediatric Cases of Variant Neurogenic Stress Cardiomyopathy After Intracranial Hemorrhage.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  25201800     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is an acquired form of left ventricular systolic dysfunction seen in the setting of physiologic stress and the absence of coronary artery disease. It is thought to be caused by excessive sympathetic stimulation. It is well described in the adult literature associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage where it is known as neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy (NSC), but few such pediatric cases have been reported. We describe our experience with 2 children (13- and 10-year-old girls) who presented with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage followed by pulmonary edema and shock. Echocardiography revealed similar patterns of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities consistent with NSC, inverted Takotsubo variant. One child progressed to death, whereas the other made a remarkable recovery, including significant improvement in cardiac function over the course of 1 week. We argue that at least 1 of these cases represents true stress-induced cardiomyopathy. This report will alert pediatricians to this transient cardiomyopathy that is likely underdiagnosed in pediatric intensive care. We also highlight the challenges of managing both shock and elevated intracranial pressure in the setting of NSC.
Authors:
Samuel G Wittekind; Ofer Yanay; Erin M Johnson; Edward F Gibbons
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2014-9-8
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1098-4275     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  2014 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-9-9     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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