Document Detail


The Turn Team: A Novel Strategy for Reducing Pressure Ulcers in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23313540     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Pressure ulcers cause significant morbidity and mortality in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). The purpose of this study was to determine if a dedicated team tasked with turning and repositioning all hemodynamically stable SICU patients could decrease the formation of pressure ulcers. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 507 patients in a 20-bed SICU in a university hospital were assessed for pressure ulcers using a point prevalence strategy, between December 2008 and September 2010, before and after implementation of a team tasked with turning and repositioning all hemodynamically stable patients every 2 hours around the clock. RESULTS: At baseline, when frequent turning was encouraged but not required, a total of 42 pressure ulcers were identified in 278 patients. After implementation of the turn team, a total of 12 pressure ulcers were identified in 229 patients (p < 0.0001). The preintervention group included 34 stage I and II ulcers and 8 higher stage ulcers. After implementation of the turn team, there were 7 stage I and II ulcers and 5 higher stage ulcers. The average Braden score was 16.5 in the preintervention group and 13.4 in the postintervention group (p = 0.04), suggesting that pressure ulcers were occurring in higher risk patients after implementation of the turn team. CONCLUSIONS: A team dedicated to turning SICU patients every 2 hours dramatically decreased the incidence of pressure ulcers. The majority of stage I and stage II ulcers appear to be preventable with an aggressive intervention aimed at pressure ulcer prevention.
Authors:
Mary D Still; Linda C Cross; Martha Dunlap; Rugenia Rencher; Elizabeth R Larkins; David L Carpenter; Timothy G Buchman; Craig M Coopersmith
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-1-10
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the American College of Surgeons     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1879-1190     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Am. Coll. Surg.     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-1-14     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9431305     Medline TA:  J Am Coll Surg     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Emory University Hospital, Department of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.
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