Document Detail


Tropical pyomyositis: a case report and review.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  440823     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Tropical pyomyositis is a disease of skeletal muscle characterized by single or multiple abscesses. The infective organism is most often penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Only recently have case reports appeared in the literature from temperate zones; however, this disease is common in the tropics. This report reviews the literature and describes a child from rural North Carolina in whom tropical pyomyositis developed after incision and drainage of a furuncle.
Authors:
J S Goldberg; W L London; D M Nagel
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  63     ISSN:  0031-4005     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  1979 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1979-07-28     Completed Date:  1979-07-28     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  298-300     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Abscess / drug therapy,  radiography*
Adult
Humans
Male
Methicillin / therapeutic use
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Myositis / drug therapy,  radiography*
Staphylococcal Infections / radiography
Vancomycin / therapeutic use
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
1404-90-6/Vancomycin; 61-32-5/Methicillin

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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