Document Detail


Transepithelial leak in Barrett's esophagus patients: the role of proton pump inhibitors.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22719187     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIM: To determine if the observed paracellular sucrose leak in Barrett's esophagus patients is due to their proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use.
METHODS: The in vivo sucrose permeability test was administered to healthy controls, to Barrett's patients and to non-Barrett's patients on continuous PPI therapy. Degree of leak was tested for correlation with presence of Barrett's, use of PPIs, and length of Barrett's segment and duration of PPI use.
RESULTS: Barrett's patients manifested a near 3-fold greater, upper gastrointestinal sucrose leak than healthy controls. A decrease of sucrose leak was observed in Barrett's patients who ceased PPI use for 7 d. Although initial introduction of PPI use (in a PPI-naïve population) results in dramatic increase in sucrose leak, long-term, continuous PPI use manifested a slow spontaneous decline in leak. The sucrose leak observed in Barrett's patients showed no correlation to the amount of Barrett's tissue present in the esophagus.
CONCLUSION: Although future research is needed to determine the degree of paracellular leak in actual Barrett's mucosa, the relatively high degree of leak observed with in vivo sucrose permeability measurement of Barrett's patients reflects their PPI use and not their Barrett's tissue per se.
Authors:
Christopher Farrell; Melissa Morgan; Owen Tully; Kevin Wolov; Keith Kearney; Benjamin Ngo; Giancarlo Mercogliano; James J Thornton; Mary Carmen Valenzano; James M Mullin
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  World journal of gastroenterology : WJG     Volume:  18     ISSN:  1007-9327     ISO Abbreviation:  World J. Gastroenterol.     Publication Date:  2012 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-06-21     Completed Date:  2012-10-23     Revised Date:  2013-07-12    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100883448     Medline TA:  World J Gastroenterol     Country:  China    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  2793-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Gastroenterology, Lankenau Hospital, Wynnewood, PA 19096, United States.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Barrett Esophagus / drug therapy*,  metabolism,  pathology
Case-Control Studies
Epithelial Cells / drug effects*,  metabolism,  pathology
Esophagus / drug effects*,  metabolism,  pathology
Humans
Metaplasia
Permeability
Philadelphia
Proton Pump Inhibitors / therapeutic use*
Sucrose / diagnostic use
Time Factors
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Proton Pump Inhibitors; 57-50-1/Sucrose
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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