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Traditional non-Western diets.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21139122     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
In traditional cultures, balancing health with a balanced lifestyle was a core belief. The diseases of modern civilization were rare. Indigenous people have patterns of illness very different from Western civilization; yet, they rapidly develop diseases once exposed to Western foods and lifestyles. Food and medicine were interwoven. All cultures used special or functional foods to prevent disease. Food could be used at different times either as food or medicine. Foods, cultivation, and cooking methods maximized community health and well-being. With methods passed down through generations, cooking processes were utilized that enhanced mineral and nutrient bioavailability. This article focuses on what researchers observed about the food traditions of indigenous people, their disease patterns, the use of specific foods, and the environmental factors that affect people who still eat traditional foods.
Authors:
Elizabeth Lipski
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Volume:  25     ISSN:  1941-2452     ISO Abbreviation:  Nutr Clin Pract     Publication Date:  2010 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-12-08     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8606733     Medline TA:  Nutr Clin Pract     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  585-93     Citation Subset:  IM; N    
Affiliation:
Hawthorn University, Asheville, North Carolina, USA. LL@innovativehealing.com
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