Document Detail


Tools for healthy tribes: improving access to healthy foods in Indian country.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22898161     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
There is growing recognition that policymakers can promote access to healthy, affordable foods within neighborhoods, schools, childcare centers, and workplaces. Despite the disproportionate risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes among American Indian children and adults, comparatively little attention has been focused on the opportunities tribal policymakers have to implement policies or resolutions to promote access to healthy, affordable foods. This paper presents an approach for integrating formative research into an action-oriented strategy of developing and disseminating tribally led environmental and policy strategies to promote access to and consumption of healthy, affordable foods. This paper explains how the American Indian Healthy Eating Project evolved through five phases and discusses each phase's essential steps involved, outcomes derived, and lessons learned. Using community-based participatory research and informed by the Social Cognitive Theory and ecologic frameworks, the American Indian Healthy Eating Project was started in fall 2008 and has evolved through five phases: (1) starting the conversation; (2) conducting multidisciplinary formative research; (3) strengthening partnerships and tailoring policy options; (4) disseminating community-generated ideas; and (5) accelerating action while fostering sustainability. Collectively, these phases helped develop and disseminate Tools for Healthy Tribes-a toolkit used to raise awareness among participating tribal policymakers of their opportunities to improve access to healthy, affordable foods. Formal and informal strategies can engage tribal leaders in the development of culturally appropriate and tribe-specific sustainable strategies to improve such access, as well as empower tribal leaders to leverage their authority toward raising a healthier generation of American Indian children.
Authors:
Sheila Fleischhacker; Randi R Byrd; Gowri Ramachandran; Maihan Vu; Amy Ries; Ronny A Bell; Kelly R Evenson
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of preventive medicine     Volume:  43     ISSN:  1873-2607     ISO Abbreviation:  Am J Prev Med     Publication Date:  2012 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-08-17     Completed Date:  2013-01-10     Revised Date:  2013-09-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8704773     Medline TA:  Am J Prev Med     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  S123-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA. sheilafly9@gmail.com
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cooperative Behavior
Food Supply / statistics & numerical data*
Health Education
Health Policy*
Health Promotion / methods*
Humans
Indians, North American / statistics & numerical data*
Nutritional Status*
Psychological Theory
Public Health*
Social Marketing
United States
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
T 32 MH75854-03/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; T32 MH075854/MH/NIMH NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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