Document Detail


Is Tongue Strength an Important Influence on Rate of Articulation in Diadochokinetic and Reading Tasks?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22199202     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between tongue strength and rate of articulation in two speech tasks, diadochokinetic rates and reading aloud, in healthy men and women between 20 and 78 years of age. METHOD: Diadochokinetic rates were measured for the syllables /p/, /t/, /k/, and /ptk/, and articulation rates were calculated for a reading of the Rainbow Passage for 57 adult volunteers. The Iowa Oral Performance Instrument was used to obtain maximum tongue pressure, tongue pressure exerted during production of /t/, and tongue endurance. Correlation analyses were performed to determine the relation among articulation rate and tongue pressure and endurance measures. RESULTS: Maximum tongue pressure, the pressure used to produce /t/, the proportion of maximum pressure used to produce /t/, and tongue endurance were poor predictors of diadochokinetic rates and articulation rate in reading for normal speakers. Discussion We must focus on factors beyond strength, such as movement precision and coordination, to improve our understanding of normal and disordered speech production in adults.
Authors:
Amy T Neel; Phyllis M Palmer
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-12-23
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1558-9102     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-12-26     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9705610     Medline TA:  J Speech Lang Hear Res     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
University of New Mexico.
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From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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