Document Detail


TOBACCO CONTROL POLICIES AND SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME IN DEVELOPED NATIONS.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  25044665     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This paper estimates the effects of higher cigarette prices and smoke-free policies on the prevalence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Using a panel of developed countries over a 20 year period, we find that higher cigarette prices are associated with reductions in the prevalence of SIDS. However, we find no evidence that smoke-free policies are associated with declines in SIDS.
Authors:
Christian King; Sara Markowitz; Hana Ross
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2014-7-18
Journal Detail:
Title:  Health economics     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1099-1050     ISO Abbreviation:  Health Econ     Publication Date:  2014 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-7-21     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9306780     Medline TA:  Health Econ     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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