Document Detail


Thirty-minute compared to standardised office blood pressure measurement in general practice.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22152748     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Although blood pressure measurement is one of the most frequently performed measurements in clinical practice, there are concerns about its reliability. Serial, automated oscillometric blood pressure measurement has the potential to reduce measurement bias and white-coat effect'.
AIM: To study agreement of 30-minute office blood pressure measurement (OBPM) with standardised OBPM, and to compare repeatability.
DESIGN AND SETTING: Method comparison study in two general practices in The Netherlands.
METHOD: Thirty-minute and standardised OBPM was carried out with the same, validated device in 83 adult patients, and the procedure was repeated after 2 weeks. During 30-minute OBPM, blood pressure was measured automatically every 3 minutes, with the patient in a sitting position, alone in a quiet room. Agreement between 30-minute and standardised OBPM was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis. Repeatability of the blood pressure measurement methods after 2 weeks was expressed as the mean difference in combination with the standard deviation of difference (SDD).
RESULTS: Mean 30-minute OBPM readings were 7.6/2.5 mmHg (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.1 to 9.1/1.5 to 3.4 mmHg) lower than standardised OBPM readings. The mean difference and SDD between repeated 30-minute OBPMs (mean difference = 3/1 mmHg, 95% CI = 1 to 5/0 to 2 mmHg; SDD 9.5/5.3 mmHg) were lower than those of standardised OBPMs (mean difference = 6/2 mmHg, 95% CI = 4 to 8/1 to 4 mmHg; SDD 10.9/6.3 mmHg).
CONCLUSION: Thirty-minute OBPM resulted in lower readings than standardised OBPM and had a better repeatability. These results suggest that 30-minute OBPM better reflects the patient's true blood pressure than standardised OBPM does.
Authors:
Nynke Scherpbier-de Haan; Mark van der Wel; Gijs Schoenmakers; Steve Boudewijns; Petronella Peer; Chris van Weel; Theo Thien; Carel Bakx
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners     Volume:  61     ISSN:  1478-5242     ISO Abbreviation:  Br J Gen Pract     Publication Date:  2011 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-12-13     Completed Date:  2012-05-17     Revised Date:  2013-06-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9005323     Medline TA:  Br J Gen Pract     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e590-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. n.scherpbier@elg.umcn.nl
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Blood Pressure Determination / methods,  standards
Female
General Practice / methods*
Humans
Hypertension / diagnosis*
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Reproducibility of Results
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Br J Gen Pract. 2012 Mar;62(596):126   [PMID:  22429417 ]
Br J Gen Pract. 2011 Sep;61(590):544-5   [PMID:  22152729 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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