Document Detail


Thermic effect of food and beta-adrenergic thermogenic responsiveness in habitually exercising and sedentary healthy adult humans.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17463294     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The thermic effect of food (TEF) is an important physiological determinant of total daily energy expenditure (EE) and energy balance. TEF is believed to be mediated in part by sympathetic nervous system activation and consequent beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) stimulation of metabolism. TEF is greater in habitually exercising than in sedentary adults, despite similar postprandial sympathetic nervous system activation. We determined whether augmented TEF in habitually exercising adults is associated with enhanced peripheral thermogenic responsiveness to beta-AR stimulation. In separate experiments in 22 sedentary and 29 habitually exercising adults, we measured the increase in EE (indirect calorimetry, ventilated hood) during beta-AR stimulation (intravenous isoproterenol: 6, 12, and 24 ng x kg fat-free mass(-1) x min(-1)) and EE before and after a liquid meal (40% of resting EE; 53% carbohydrate, 32% fat, 15% protein). The increase in EE during incremental isoproterenol administration was greater (P = 0.01) in habitual exercisers (0.34 +/- 0.03, 0.54 +/- 0.04, 0.81 +/- 0.05 kJ/min; means +/- SE) than in sedentary adults (0.26 +/- 0.03, 0.40 +/- 0.03, 0.64 +/- 0.04 kJ/min). The area under the TEF response curve was also greater (P = 0.04) in habitual exercisers (160 +/- 9 kJ) than in sedentary adults (130 +/- 11 kJ) and was positively related to beta-AR thermogenic responsiveness (r = 0.32, P = 0.02). We conclude that TEF is related to beta-AR thermogenic responsiveness and that the greater TEF in habitual exercisers is attributable in part to their augmented beta-AR thermogenic responsiveness. Our results also suggest that peripheral thermogenic responsiveness to beta-AR stimulation is a physiological determinant of TEF and hence energy balance in healthy adult humans.
Authors:
Nicole R Stob; Christopher Bell; Marleen A van Baak; Douglas R Seals
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2007-04-26
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985)     Volume:  103     ISSN:  8750-7587     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Appl. Physiol.     Publication Date:  2007 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-08-01     Completed Date:  2007-09-20     Revised Date:  2013-09-26    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8502536     Medline TA:  J Appl Physiol (1985)     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  616-22     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Agonists / pharmacology
Adult
Aged
Body Temperature Regulation / physiology*
Eating / physiology*
Energy Metabolism / physiology
Exercise / physiology*
Female
Humans
Isoproterenol / pharmacology
Male
Middle Aged
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta / drug effects,  physiology*
Rest / physiology*
Sex Characteristics
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
5-M01 RR-00051/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; AG-00279/AG/NIA NIH HHS; AG-006537/AG/NIA NIH HHS; AG-015897/AG/NIA NIH HHS; AG-022053/AG/NIA NIH HHS; AG-19365/AG/NIA NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Adrenergic beta-Agonists; 0/Receptors, Adrenergic, beta; 7683-59-2/Isoproterenol

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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