Document Detail


There is nothing paranormal about near-death experiences: how neuroscience can explain seeing bright lights, meeting the dead, or being convinced you are one of them.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21852181     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Approximately 3% of Americans declare to have had a near-death experience. These experiences classically involve the feeling that one's soul has left the body, approaches a bright light and goes to another reality, where love and bliss are all encompassing. Contrary to popular belief, research suggests that there is nothing paranormal about these experiences. Instead, near-death experiences are the manifestation of normal brain function gone awry, during a traumatic, and sometimes harmless, event.
Authors:
Dean Mobbs; Caroline Watt
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review     Date:  2011-08-17
Journal Detail:
Title:  Trends in cognitive sciences     Volume:  15     ISSN:  1879-307X     ISO Abbreviation:  Trends Cogn. Sci. (Regul. Ed.)     Publication Date:  2011 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-09-29     Completed Date:  2012-02-02     Revised Date:  2012-10-19    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9708669     Medline TA:  Trends Cogn Sci     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  447-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF, UK. dean.mobbs@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Attitude to Death*
Brain / physiology*
Death*
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
Humans
Light
Neurosciences*
Public Opinion
Vision, Ocular
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
//Medical Research Council
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Trends Cogn Sci. 2012 Sep;16(9):445; author reply 446   [PMID:  22868045 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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