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Teratology studies in the rabbit.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23138902     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The rabbit is generally the non-rodent species or second species after the rat recommended by the regulatory authorities and is part of the package of regulatory reproductive studies for the detection of potential embryotoxic and/or teratogenic effects of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, food additives, and other compounds, including vaccines (see Chapters 1-7).Its availability, practicality in housing and in mating as well as its large size makes the rabbit the preferred choice as a non-rodent species. The study protocols are essentially similar to those established for the rat (Chapter 9), with some particularities. The study designs are well defined in guidelines and are relatively standardized between testing laboratories across the world.As for the rat, large litter sizes and extensive background data in the rabbit are valuable criteria for an optimal assessment of in utero development of the embryo or fetus and for the detection of potential external or internal fetal malformations.
Authors:
Linda Allais; Lucie Reynaud
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)     Volume:  947     ISSN:  1940-6029     ISO Abbreviation:  Methods Mol. Biol.     Publication Date:  2013  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-09     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9214969     Medline TA:  Methods Mol Biol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  139-56     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Ricerca Biosciences, Saint-Germain sur l'Arbresle, France, Linda.allais@ricerca.com.
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