Document Detail


Technology improves upper extremity rehabilitation.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21763524     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Stroke survivors with hemiparesis and spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors with tetraplegia find it difficult or impossible to perform many activities of daily life. There is growing evidence that intensive exercise therapy, especially when supplemented with functional electrical stimulation (FES), can improve upper extremity function, but delivering the treatment can be costly, particularly after recipients leave rehabilitation facilities. Recently, there has been a growing level of interest among researchers and healthcare policymakers to deliver upper extremity treatments to people in their homes using in-home teletherapy (IHT). The few studies that have been carried out so far have encountered a variety of logistical and technical problems, not least the difficulty of conducting properly controlled and blinded protocols that satisfy the requirements of high-level evidence-based research. In most cases, the equipment and communications technology were not designed for individuals with upper extremity disability. It is clear that exercise therapy combined with interventions such as FES, supervised over the Internet, will soon be adopted worldwide in one form or another. Therefore it is timely that researchers, clinicians, and healthcare planners interested in assessing IHT be aware of the pros and cons of the new technology and the factors involved in designing appropriate studies of it. It is crucial to understand the technical barriers, the role of telesupervisors, the motor improvements that participants can reasonably expect and the process of optimizing IHT-exercise therapy protocols to maximize the benefits of the emerging technology.
Authors:
Jan Kowalczewski; Arthur Prochazka
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Progress in brain research     Volume:  192     ISSN:  1875-7855     ISO Abbreviation:  Prog. Brain Res.     Publication Date:  2011  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-07-18     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376441     Medline TA:  Prog Brain Res     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  147-59     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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