Document Detail


Targeting social and economic correlates of cancer treatment appointment keeping among immigrant Chinese patients.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21246300     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Chinese immigrants have high rates of a variety of cancers and face numerous social and economic barriers to cancer treatment appointment keeping. This study is a nested cohort of 82 Chinese patients participating in the Immigrant Cancer Portal Project. Twenty-two percent reported having missed appointments for oncology follow-up, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy. Patients most commonly reported needing assistance with financial support to enable appointment keeping. Efforts to further address social and economic correlates in cancer care should be developed for this population.
Authors:
Francesca Gany; Julia Ramirez; Serena Chen; Jennifer C F Leng
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of urban health : bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine     Volume:  88     ISSN:  1468-2869     ISO Abbreviation:  J Urban Health     Publication Date:  2011 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-02-21     Completed Date:  2011-06-24     Revised Date:  2013-06-30    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9809909     Medline TA:  J Urban Health     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  98-103     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Center for Immigrant Health Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, OBV, CD-401, New York, NY 10016, USA. francesca.gany@nyumc.org
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Appointments and Schedules*
Asian Americans*
China / ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms / drug therapy*,  economics,  ethnology
New York
Patient Preference*
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
United States
Young Adult
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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