Document Detail


Take traveller's diarrhoea to heart.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17448951     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Diarrhoea is a common health problem among travellers worldwide. We focus attention on the recognition of the postinfectious complications of traveller's diarrhoea. An English traveller, aged 43, attended a hospital in Benidorm (Spain) complaining of chest pain. A week previously, fever and severe diarrhoea were present. The electrocardiogram and cardiac enzymes were not normal. The coproculture yielded Campylobacter jejunii. Acute myocarditis can be an exceptional complication of gastroenteritis masquerading as acute myocardial infarction or leading to congestive heart failure.
Authors:
Vicente Mera; Teresa López; Josefa Serralta
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article     Date:  2007-01-10
Journal Detail:
Title:  Travel medicine and infectious disease     Volume:  5     ISSN:  1477-8939     ISO Abbreviation:  Travel Med Infect Dis     Publication Date:  2007 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-04-23     Completed Date:  2007-07-17     Revised Date:  2009-10-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101230758     Medline TA:  Travel Med Infect Dis     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  202-3     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Clínica Benidorm, Internal Medicine, Av Alfonso Puchades, 8, 03500 Benidorm, Alicante, Spain. v.mera@telefonica.net
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Campylobacter Infections / complications,  diagnosis*,  microbiology
Campylobacter jejuni / isolation & purification*
Diagnosis, Differential
Diarrhea / complications*
Electrocardiography
Emergency Treatment
England
Humans
Male
Myocarditis / complications,  diagnosis*,  microbiology
Spain
Travel*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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