Document Detail


Sympathetic neural outflow and chemoreflex sensitivity are related to spontaneous breathing rate in normal men.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16344363     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Respiration contributes importantly to short-term modulation of sympathetic nerve activity. However, the relationship between spontaneous breathing rate, chemoreflex function, and direct measures of sympathetic traffic in healthy humans has not been studied previously. We tested the hypothesis that muscle sympathetic nerve activity and chemoreflex sensitivity are linked independently to respiratory rate in normal subjects. We studied 69 normal male subjects aged 29.6+/-8.1 years. Subjects were subdivided according to the tertiles of respiratory rate distributions. Mean respiration rate was 10.6 breaths/min in the first tertile, 14.8 breaths/min in the second tertile, and 18.0 breaths/min in the third tertile. Subjects from the third tertile (faster respiratory rate) had greater sympathetic activity than subjects from the first tertile (slower respiratory rate; 29+/-3 versus 17+/-2 bursts/min; P<0.001). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed that only respiratory rate was linked independently to sympathetic activity (r=0.42; P<0.001). In comparison to subjects with slow respiratory rate, subjects with fast respiratory rate had greater increases in minute ventilation during both hypercapnia (7.3+/-0.8 versus 3.2+/-1.0 L/min; P=0.005) and hypoxia (5.7+/-0.8 versus 2.4+/-0.7 L/min; P=0.007). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity and chemoreflex sensitivity are linked to spontaneous respiratory rate in normal humans. Faster respiratory rate is associated with higher levels of sympathetic traffic and potentiated responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Spontaneous breathing frequency, central sympathetic outflow, and chemoreflex sensitivity exhibit significant and hitherto unrecognized interactions in the modulation of neural circulatory control.
Authors:
Krzysztof Narkiewicz; Philippe van de Borne; Nicola Montano; Dagmara Hering; Tomas Kara; Virend K Somers
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2005-12-12
Journal Detail:
Title:  Hypertension     Volume:  47     ISSN:  1524-4563     ISO Abbreviation:  Hypertension     Publication Date:  2006 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-12-23     Completed Date:  2006-01-12     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7906255     Medline TA:  Hypertension     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  51-5     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Hypertension and Diabetology, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland. knark@amg.gda.pl
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Anoxia / physiopathology
Blood Pressure
Chemoreceptor Cells / physiology*
Cold Temperature
Humans
Hypercapnia / physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Muscles / innervation
Peroneal Nerve / physiology
Reference Values
Reflex / physiology*
Respiratory Mechanics / physiology*
Sympathetic Nervous System / physiology*,  physiopathology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
3F05 TW05200/TW/FIC NIH HHS; HL14388/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; HL61560/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; HL65176/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; M01-RR00059/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01-RR00585/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; R03 TW0 1148/TW/FIC NIH HHS

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