Document Detail


Sympathetic activation and contribution of genetic factors in hypertension with neurovascular compression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10608471     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: The rostral ventrolateral medulla is an important center for the regulation of sympathetic and cardiovascular activities. Reportedly, neurovascular compression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla may be causally related to essential hypertension. We aimed to determine the mechanism behind elevated blood pressure in hypertensive patients with compression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla and to investigate whether genetic factors contribute to the etiology of hypertension with compression. DESIGN AND METHODS: The study included 56 patients with essential hypertension and 25 normotensive individuals. With the use of magnetic resonance imaging, the essential hypertension group was subdivided into hypertension with compression and without compression groups. We compared plasma levels of hormones that raise blood pressure and family histories of hypertension between the two hypertension groups and the normotension group. RESULTS: Plasma norepinephrine levels, but not plasma renin activity, aldosterone, epinephrine, or vasopressin levels, were significantly higher in the hypertension with compression group (389+/-53 pg/ml) than in the hypertension without compression group (217+/-38, P<0.05) or in the normotension group (225+/-30, P<0.05). The percentage of individuals who had two hypertensive parents was significantly higher in the hypertension with compression group (39.4%) than in the hypertension without compression group (13.0%, P<0.05) or in the normotension group (8.0%, P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that neurovascular compression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla might be, at least in part, causally related to essential hypertension by increasing sympathetic nerve activity. They also suggest that genetic factors might contribute to the etiology of hypertension with neurovascular compression.
Authors:
S Morimoto; S Sasaki; H Itoh; T Nakata; K Takeda; M Nakagawa; S Furuya; S Naruse; R Fukuyama; S Fushiki
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of hypertension     Volume:  17     ISSN:  0263-6352     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Hypertens.     Publication Date:  1999 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-01-05     Completed Date:  2000-01-05     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8306882     Medline TA:  J Hypertens     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1577-82     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Second Department of Medicine, Research Institute for Neurological Diseases and Geriatrics, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kawaramachi-Hirokoji, Japan. morimot@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Alleles
Constriction, Pathologic
Female
Hormones / blood
Humans
Hypertension / blood,  etiology,  genetics*,  physiopathology*
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Medical Records
Medulla Oblongata / blood supply*,  pathology
Middle Aged
Nerve Compression Syndromes / complications*,  diagnosis
Norepinephrine / blood
Reference Values
Sympathetic Nervous System / physiopathology*
Vascular Diseases / complications*,  diagnosis
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Hormones; 51-41-2/Norepinephrine

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