Document Detail


Symbol addition by monkeys provides evidence for normalized quantity coding.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24753600     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Weber's law can be explained either by a compressive scaling of sensory response with stimulus magnitude or by a proportional scaling of response variability. These two mechanisms can be distinguished by asking how quantities are added or subtracted. We trained Rhesus monkeys to associate 26 distinct symbols with 0-25 drops of reward, and then tested how they combine, or add, symbolically represented reward magnitude. We found that they could combine symbolically represented magnitudes, and they transferred this ability to a novel symbol set, indicating that they were performing a calculation, not just memorizing the value of each combination. The way they combined pairs of symbols indicated neither a linear nor a compressed scale, but rather a dynamically shifting, relative scaling.
Authors:
Margaret S Livingstone; Warren W Pettine; Krishna Srihasam; Brandon Moore; Istvan A Morocz; Daeyeol Lee
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2014-4-21
Journal Detail:
Title:  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1091-6490     ISO Abbreviation:  Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.     Publication Date:  2014 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-4-22     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7505876     Medline TA:  Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
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