Document Detail


Swimming performance after passive and active recovery of various durations.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19211948     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: To examine the effects of active and passive recovery of various durations after a 100-m swimming test performed at maximal effort. METHODS: Eleven competitive swimmers (5 males, 6 females, age: 17.3 +/- 0.6 y) completed two 100-m tests with a 15-min interval at a maximum swimming effort under three experimental conditions. The recovery between tests was 15 min passive (PAS), 5 min active, and 10 min passive (5ACT) or 10 min active and 5 min passive (10ACT). Self-selected active recovery started immediately after the first test, corresponding to 60 +/- 5% of the 100-m time. Blood samples were taken at rest, 5, 10, and 15 min after the first as well as 5 min after the second 100-m test for blood lactate determination. Heart rate was also recorded during the corresponding periods. RESULTS: Performance time of the first 100 m was not different between conditions (P > .05). The second 100-m test after the 5ACT (64.49 +/- 3.85 s) condition was faster than 10ACT (65.49 +/- 4.63 s) and PAS (65.89 +/- 4.55 s) conditions (P < .05). Blood lactate during the 15-min recovery period between the 100-m efforts was lower in both active recovery conditions compared with passive recovery (P < .05). Heart rate was higher during the 5ACT and 10ACT conditions compared with PAS during the 15-min recovery period (P < .05). CONCLUSION: Five minutes of active recovery during a 15-min interval period is adequate to facilitate blood lactate removal and enhance performance in swimmers. Passive recovery and/or 10 min of active recovery is not recommended.
Authors:
Argyris G Toubekis; Argiro Tsolaki; Ilias Smilios; Helen T Douda; Thomas Kourtesis; Savvas P Tokmakidis
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of sports physiology and performance     Volume:  3     ISSN:  1555-0265     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2008 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-02-12     Completed Date:  2009-03-26     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101276430     Medline TA:  Int J Sports Physiol Perform     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  375-86     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Education and Sports Science, Democritus University of Thrace, Komotini, Greece.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Athletic Performance / physiology*
Competitive Behavior / physiology
Female
Humans
Lactic Acid / administration & dosage,  blood
Male
Muscle Fatigue / physiology
Recovery of Function / physiology*
Swimming / physiology*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
50-21-5/Lactic Acid

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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