Document Detail


Sweet potato: a review of its past, present, and future role in human nutrition.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17425943     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The overall objective of this chapter is to review the past, present, and future role of the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam) in human nutrition. Specifically, the chapter describes the role of the sweet potato in human diets; outlines the biochemical and nutritional composition of the sweet potato with emphasis on its beta-carotene and anthocyanin contents; highlights sweet potato utilization, and its potential as value-added products in human food systems; and demonstrates the potential of the sweet potato in the African context. Early records have indicated that the sweet potato is a staple food source for many indigenous populations in Central and South Americas, Ryukyu Island, Africa, the Caribbean, the Maori people, Hawaiians, and Papua New Guineans. Protein contents of sweet potato leaves and roots range from 4.0% to 27.0% and 1.0% to 9.0%, respectively. The sweet potato could be considered as an excellent novel source of natural health-promoting compounds, such as beta-carotene and anthocyanins, for the functional food market. Also, the high concentration of anthocyanin and beta-carotene in sweet potato, combined with the high stability of the color extract make it a promising and healthier alternative to synthetic coloring agents in food systems. Starch and flour processing from sweet potato can create new economic and employment activities for farmers and rural households, and can add nutritional value to food systems. Repositioning sweet potato production and its potential for value-added products will contribute substantially to utilizing its benefits and many uses in human food systems. Multidisciplinary, integrated research and development activities aimed at improving production, storage, postharvest and processing technologies, and quality of the sweet potato and its potential value-added products are critical issues, which should be addressed globally.
Authors:
Adelia C Bovell-Benjamin
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Advances in food and nutrition research     Volume:  52     ISSN:  1043-4526     ISO Abbreviation:  Adv. Food Nutr. Res.     Publication Date:  2007  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-04-11     Completed Date:  2007-05-29     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9001271     Medline TA:  Adv Food Nutr Res     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1-59     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Tuskegee/NASA Center for Food and Environmental Systems for Human Exploration of Space, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL 36088, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Anthocyanins / analysis
Consumer Satisfaction
Dietary Fiber / analysis
Humans
Ipomoea batatas / chemistry*,  physiology
Minerals / analysis*
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*
Nutritive Value*
Plant Proteins / analysis
Taste
Vitamins / analysis*
beta Carotene / analysis
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Anthocyanins; 0/Minerals; 0/Plant Proteins; 0/Vitamins; 7235-40-7/beta Carotene

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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